Using Your Existing Foam Processing Equipment For Applying Polyurea Coatings

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Today we will discuss using your existing foam processing equipment for applying polyurea coatings.
Your spray foam equipment is your most a valuable and useful tool when  using it to apply other products such as polyurea it can increase your profits widen your customer base and allow you to offer a technology your competitors don't provide understanding the basics of processing polyurea and how to use your spray foam equipment to apply it are essential most polyurethane foam proportioners typically have a maximum processing pressure capability of up to 2,000 psi.
They also have smaller primary heaters which need to be considered when using your spray foam equipment to apply polyurea is essential to note that polyurea is achieved their best physical properties when processed at high pressures those more fabulous than 3000 psi and temperatures greater than 160 degrees Fahrenheit as you know to achieve quality spray foam less pressure ]and lower temperatures are needed when you have a polyuria application under consideration is important to consult
your supplier to get guidance on ensuring your spray foam equipment is capable of manufacturing a strong enough
polyurea for the surface environment in which the polyuria will be performing examples of applications where the spray foam equipment can apply polyurea include spray and bedliners waterproofing corrosion protection of steel and several other applications where machines capable of higher pressures and temperatures are required include chemical resistant secondary containment high abrasive areas potable water coatings internal tank linings blast mitigation and other applications were settling for anything less than the most optimum strength polyuria is not acceptable when using your spray foam proportion air to process poly areas you will need to turn up your pressures to the machine's maximum capability which is typically 2,000 psi you will also need to adjust the primary heaters and hose heat settings to 170 degrees Fahrenheit polyurea is a and components require more impingement
Image result for Using Your Existing Foam Processing Equipment For Applying Polyurea Coatingsmixing than foams it is common practice to use a lower output mixing chamber this will increase the impingement
mixing of the two components within the mixing chamber it will also allow more residence time the a and B components as they travel slower through the primary heater remember temperature is important with some polyuria formulas a 10 degree temperature difference can affect your finished polyurea strength by as much as
15 to 20 percent depending on your proportioners heater wattage capacity it may be necessary to increase the
product temperature in their containers before processing approximately 24 hours before you begin to heat the product with power blankets heat bands a hot box surrounding the drums or only warming the area where the products are stored as with all products it is good practice to keep the containers off of steel or concrete floors when trying to keep the material warm spray foam air purge guns will produce an active enough pol area
for some of the primary applications as we noted previously as long as the right the mixing chamber and adjustments are made to your processing settings on the
proportioner with polyurea technology it is important to note that just because a machine and spray gun can
process and apply a polyurea and then it becomes tap free that does not mean that is what should be used for the expected the service performance of that product one
change always affects everything else it is essential to understand and follow this when preparing for polyuria
applications additionally as with spray foam to field measure the polyureas reactivity profile always reference your supplier's technical datasheets for processing requirements and gel intact free times thank you for watching this how to do it with an spi educational video

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How to Install Spray Foam Insulation DIY











Hi, I'm Shannon from host improvements comm and today, I'm going to show you how to use a two-part spray foam insulation package. There'S a lot of different manufacturers of these packages, so just depend of what's available in your area, even though I'm going to show you how to use this particular one make sure you for sure read all the safety instructions and the user manual in whatever package you Get just to be sure that in case there's, any differences from manufacturer to manufacturer, so the one we have today is a what they call a two hundred kit. So what they're saying is that the yield on it will be about two hundred square feet worth of foam at one inch thick, so we're gon na be spraying close to two inches thick here, so we'll be hopefully getting around 100 square feet out of these two Cans at two inches thick, so once I opened up the box, some of the first things you find is you're gon na find the instruction manual as well as the the you know: safety equipment, that's needed and all of little tips and that sort of thing so Make sure you read that over well, most of these guys have 1-800 numbers and websites as well. So if you have other questions, you can get ahold of somebody to ask. You should find an assortment of some different spray. Nozzles. These guys send two different types and they they've sent about. I don't know four or five of each one. It looks like so this particular nozzle here is just for spraying. You know gaps and cracks sort of thing. It'S gon na send out a stream, so that would be that one here this one here is a fan tip. It'S got a bit of a v-notch cut in the end, so this one's gon na spray out about a I don't know it just depends on the kit you're using but probably eight inch or so fan width of pattern, which is good for filling wall. Cavities, like what we're gon na do here, so you'll have a bit of a selection of the of the tips in there. This kit comes with two two containers: two two steel cylinders. This particular one already has the hoses and the gun already hooked to it. That does have a bit of a carrying handle here as well. Some of the bigger kits they're gon na have tanks to teach in tanks, obviously because it's two components, but the tanks are much larger, so they come boxed separately just because they're too heavy to to carry is one unit. So in here, like I said this, one, the the gun and the hoses are already attached to the tanks. Some of them you will, it will come with a wrench and you may have to attach your own hoses and gun a couple things to go over. I guess, since I've got the gun out putting on the tips, the gun has a bit of a safety trigger here this one. So the yellow button down here has to be compressed or pressed before you can actually squeeze the trigger. The tanks are still turned off by the way, so you don't want to turn them on until you're actually ready to spray. So this gun has a safety on it to attach a nozzle just get. It orientated wait right, there's, usually some marks in the end of the gun that correspond to the the way the nozzle looks and just push it in there on this one, this little lever here, you should just hear it click in like that and just look to Make sure that the little believer hook down on the lock knob on the top of the nozzle so putting the nozzle on just like that, taking it off squeeze this button, pull it off when you're spraying? If you stop, for more than about thirty seconds, you're, probably gon na find that you'll have to change your nozzle. So it's a good idea, get yourself all set up, get things out of the way, so that, once you start spraying, you can just kind of keep going with it and you aren't losing a bunch of time. Otherwise, you're gon na have to change your nozzles. What happens is the two components come in each come in their own hose and once they hit the nozzle there's a kind of a spiral II set up inside of the nozzle here that actually starts to mix the two homes, because until the two products mixed together, They don't actually have the chemical reaction which causes them to expand and cure. So if you stop for too long, it starts to set up in here and it clogs, and it's not gon na work properly. So that's why they send you multiple ones. So if you stop pop your tip off, put a new one on and away you go again, they also in this bag sent some petroleum jelly. So what they'd like you to do is smear some of the jelly right inside of the gun here and that just helps to allow your your tips not to seal up rate at the end of the gun. So you can just throw your tip way put anyone on and everything should be fine, so we've got the jelly optimally. Your tanks need to be around are usually about 24 degrees Celsius around so that'd be what I don't know about 79 78 degrees Fahrenheit to get the most yield out of them and to make everything work properly, so keep them somewhere stored. Warm you can spray on to a cooler surface, but you don't want something. That'S frosty and wet so like here where we're doing this in February and it's a below grade. So the wall is cool, but it's actually still about 2 degrees Celsius. So and there's no frost present, so that's your tanks once we're ready to go we're gon na open, both valves on the tanks completely you're gon na see the product start to come down the line once once. It fills up the lines. Oh before that, sorry, you should shake the tanks really well. I think it's usually around 3040 seconds. You need to agitate the tanks that will just get things mixed together, open your valves, let it bleed into the lines. Do your petroleum jelly, get your tip, ready and and then you're pretty much close to being ready to spray, and obviously, before that, put on all your your protective equipment protective equipment? These guys recommend, if you don't have real good ventilation, that you should be wearing a respirator similar to this and it's fitted with cartridges that are for organic vapor as well as particle filtration, so they're kind of a two-part cannister one. Does the organic part of the chemicals and the other just does the any solids that might be in the air? So so it's important to have that if you don't have the proper ventilation, we did a did. A video with us with a similar product there a while ago, and we had a lot of people freaking out because we weren't wearing a mask. We did talk in the video, how we had lots of ventilation and everything, but we still had people kind of freaking out, so we've actually gon na redo this video today and we don't have the ventilation here quite as good. We just were able to open a couple windows, so we're gon na use the mask for sure also some rubber gloves to protect your hands. You already see that I have the the painters suit on or the bodysuit on, to protect my clothing, I'm wearing a hat I'll, have safety glasses on. So it's just to protect yourself from any spray back that you might get. It doesn't happen very often, but you never know you could get some bounce back onto you so and it doesn't come off that easily. You definitely don't want it in your eyes or your mouth or anything like that. So so that's for the protective part. I think I've I've shaken the tanks, pretty good, we'll give him another little shake shake before we go just before. I actually use a nozzle and once I've got the tanks open, I'm gon na shoot the gun into a garbage can or a box or in our case, we're gon na use. A garbage can just to make sure I'm getting two fairly even streams coming out. Then I'll get my tip on and and start spraying, so when you're spraying it's much like kind of in a way like spraying paint. If you've ever had to do that, we're gon na come up to the wall. We want to be about six or eight inches away from the wall and we're just gon na. You know, regulate our speed by hand to put on the amount that we want to see get on now. Remember it's going to expand some, so you don't want to fill the cavity rate up right away or once it expands you're just gon na be having to cut it all off, because it's it's sticking out too much. You know. So it's simply squeeze the trigger regulate. Your speed let go of the trigger squeeze and come down again. Okay, so you just keep doing that. We'Re gon na do these some of these spaces here in preparation. What we've done any electrical boxes, you'll want to tape them up or seal them up, because once the foam gets in and around them, it'll actually expand into the the open holes and cavities of the box and actually end up inside. So you want to prevent that. So we've just wrapped this one in some plastic, the wiring is fine to be embedded in the spray foam that isn't a problem. We'Ve just basically brushed the wall off, made sure it wasn't covered in any cobwebs and dust and that if the wall is damp or frosty or anything you you want to make sure you warm it up and dry it off before you spray this on that won't Bond to the concrete as well, you will get some probably overspray onto some of your framing materials here. We'Ve just got two by twos, but that will clean off with a scraper fairly easily once it secured anything. That'S around the area that you don't want to get foam on, just Paulie it up or tape it off or whatever. Just to be sure you aren't getting some overspray on anything that you didn't want to cover so we're gon na spray. Some rate on this concrete wall, I'm gon na, go up and do a couple cavities in that wood wall too. It'S really just the same thing, but I just thought: I'd show it since we can. I think that's pretty much covering everything that I'd talked about again. Remember just keep your foam canisters at a good temperature. These ones actually have a little temperature gauge on them. So that's kind of handy to know where you're at but just keep them inside, so they're they're warmed up and good to go. You don't want to directly. You know blast a furnace on them or wrap them in electrical heat blanket or something like that, not nothing that extreme, but just make sure they're warmed up well, okay, so I'm going to put on my protective equipment. You may not be able to hear me as well with the mask on so that's why I was trying to cover everything here well before I get all suited up, but I may may do bit of talking with the mask on, but it may not be that Clear so so I'm just going to break away here for a minute, get my personal, personal, protective equipment on and then we'll come back and show you how to spray [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ] [, Music, ] [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [ Applause, ], [ Applause, ], [ Applause, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], okay, so we've let things sit here for a little bit and let the fumes get out. So we can take the mask off and finish up. You can see it's expanded out nicely, it's nice and firm. If you get a wrong mixture, sometimes you'll get a clogged line or something. So if you get too much of one of the chemicals - and I can't remember - which way it is you'll actually get soft mushy foam and if it goes, the other way where the other chemical is is too much. The foam is really brittle in and it almost just doesn't stand up. If you touch it, it actually crumbles away right away where this is well. This is good. This is nice and firm. That'S exactly what we want so now. The next step that we're kind of at and some actually something I didn't mention - was in most areas. If you spray up the two inches, you more than likely will not have to put the poly vapor barrier on the inside, so just check with your local codes. On that, the one thing to consider when doing that, and you notice that I put on two to three different coats like passes, so that those first couple get a chance to actually cure before you cover them up and form that skin over it, which gives you That that airlock or that air stoppage, because what's gon na happen now you can see where some of this foam has expanded past the actual framing. So I'm gon na go back. You know and trim it back flush. So now, if I did had done that all in one pass now that I cut that that probably compromises the vapor barrier, qualities of it where because I've got those couple passes in behind that, I'm not going to be cutting into. In my opinion, that's still pretty good, so in this case we're we're actually only in most in a lot of this we're a little less than an inch and a quarter or inch and a half thick. So we'll we're gon na need and from my area, we're gon na need another vapor barrier anyways, but something to consider so, if you're free, if you're spraying into a 2x4 wall where you've got the the ability to spray at two or two and a half inches Thick go ahead and do it check with your local Building Authority because you may not have to put a vapor barrier over after okay, let's move on so we've got it all sprayed. You can see I'm just taking a utility knife and just shaving this down flush with the studs and just clean it all up peel it off. So you just go around, do all that, because otherwise, if it's sticking out and you go to drywall over top of that, it's it's gon na give you some issues with pop screws and that sort of thing. Okay, so just keep going around another thing you can use is the old handy red bar scrape things down, get right, underneath it scrape it off like that once the foam is, is its secured point. This is not hazardous anymore. You can throw this right in the garbage, don't eat it, throw it in the garbage, but you don't you don't need the mask. I don't really even need the gloves on anymore, but just go around. Get things cleaned up so that it's all good for when you want to put the finishing touches over top of it? What else did I forget anything? I think that I think that should cover it so now you've seen how to do it. This may not be the most economical way if you're gon na do a whole basement. These kits aren't aren't real cheap. It might be cheaper to actually have a pearl come in and give you a price to do the whole thing. If you're in a remote area, though this might be the only option you have, if you're gon na do a you know a couple rooms or a little bit of space, then also again, it might might still be very economical to do it like this. This stuff works really good for joist ends as well so, and we do have a video on that. So if you want to check that out so yeah, I think that's all. I can tell you so that again, I'm Shannon from house improvements and if you want to go to our website, you can check out the forum. Ask any questions you might have about this on there and I'll get get a reply off to you as soon as I can, and also you can check out our YouTube channel and see all the other videos we have thanks for coming and watching.
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3 Spray Foam Problems (You Will Run Into)








How do y'all, it's Jordan Smith, there's five things that this wall behind me is doing right. Now, it's keeping the roof off of my head. It is keeping out moisture, it is keeping out air, it is controlling heat and it is controlling vapor drive. Today, I'm going to talk about this product here, spray foam and its ability to keep out both heat and air. So everybody knows that spray foam is a good insulator. It has a high r-value if installed correctly, it can also be a good air barrier. There'S a few things that you need to look for to make sure that both of those are done as well as they could be on a Spray insulation job. So, first you want to make sure that your required thickness for your insulation value is actually there. The spray foam doesn't have to be full cavity depth, meaning you don't have to overfill the cavity and then come shave it back off, especially if you're using a thicker stud and your R values are lower. Maybe you only need say, four inches of insulation and you've got a two by six and so you'll have some insulation. That is just this bubbly texture on the front and it's not shaved off the problem with a under filled cavity. Even if it's to the right thickness is it's hard to tell if there's any spots that are under filled, if you went all the way to full cavity thickness and then shaved it, even though you're wasting that time and that labor and the material that you're putting On the floor, it's easy to check to make sure that it is all uniform thickness in this house. I'Ve seen several places where it's actually under filled, where there's not enough insulation and we're gon na have to come in and bring that back to full thickness. The second thing that this spray foam insulation should do is keep air from infiltrating into the house. At least that was the case in their original design. This is a house that we have taken over mid construction. It was all the way to sheetrock and they were putting cabinets on the wall. We'Ve ripped off all the exterior cladding and all the interior and are redoing it, and we found several places where this spray foam is not only under filled but also pulling away from the studs. And so, if that spray foam is pulling away from the studs in the same place, that you have a seam in your sheathing and the exterior sheathing is not taped or doesn't have a fully applied membrane of some sort, keeping out the air, then your air will Leak right through that hole in the the gap in the sheathing and then right through the gap between your stud and your spray foam. I called my spray foam buddy up and I said hey what causes that I'm doing this video. What causes it to pull away from the studs? He said man, it's so hard to tell you in a quick phone call without actually being there, because there's all kinds of parameters, there's the heat of or the temperature of, the spray foam as it's coming out of the guns too hot, and you have a problem Too cold and you have a problem if the studs are wet. You'Ll have a problem. If the humidity in the air is not exactly right and the operators not cognizant of it, you can have a problem. So there's a ton of variables that the operator has to be aware of when he's applying this, to make sure that he is doing the best possible job now, even if you get a really good operator - and they put it in really well - and your whole wall Is airtight because you've done everything right? You still have this issue here at the bottom plate now in this house. What they've done is they've, come with this foam, this fire-rated foam and have sealed the bottom plate this stuff. I don't like for this very reason. I can come up here and chip, it chip it away all day long with my finger now. The idea is, it goes in and then you're finished floor goes in and everything is good and everybody's happy. The reality is that we've got a lot more construction left here and that is going to be chipped up all over the place and then over time, as this bottom plate expands and contracts and as our concrete expands and contracts at different rates. That interface is not going to hold up with that spray foam. It just doesn't have the adhesion that we need, so I much prefer a either a caulking process or I'll show you what we did here with the poly Guard stuff once we get outside so another place that spray foam is weak on air sealing is where the Wall and the roof assemblies meet I'm outside the original house right now, we've added this on, but it's a great place to look up and see where the original rafters exited the house. We had an exterior wall coming up here. Meeting this roof and they've put up OSB blocking, and then they sprayed it from the inside with spray foam for the air sealing. The problem is every time that they have the scabbed on stud tying the rafter into the load, supporting stud there's about a half inch to quarter inch air gap between every single one of those and that's a huge place for air to leak in so spray foam Is prone to air leakage? What do you do? Well, we don't depend on spray foam for our air sealing we've done it in the past, and we've had good numbers that spray foam will give you numbers that hit code. We have to be at least three ACH here in Austin down in Houston, Thera, five ACH. So, if you're, he trying to hit those types of numbers, spray foam will get you where you're going. But if you're trying to get really low - let's say passive, which is 0.6 ACH, then you've got to do a different strategy. I'M going to take you outside and show you what we're doing on this house for both our moisture and our air control. So if spray foam is not the panacea of air sealing that we might have thought it was, what do we do well, in this case, we're actually getting our air sealing from the outside of the wall with a luma. This is Polly walls, Illuma flash and it's a fully adhered WRB that is stuck to our OSB and seals all of the seams in between the different panels. So we don't get air infiltration through there. Now some different products that are applied with just say, cap, head staples, will do okay on infiltration because they will get sucked in tight between those when the airs leaking in between those seams. The fabric will get pulled in tight and will stop that air leak somewhat. But on exfiltration you'll actually create a balloon, you're actually blowing that WRB away from your wall. So I really like the fully adhered membranes for air sealing now remember: the wall coming down to the foundation is another very weak spot for air infiltration, because on the inside remember, I said I didn't like the spray foam between the bottom plate and the foundation. It chips away and if that chips way, then air can just leak right through that scene. What we do is we use blue barriers, joint filler, and this is actually an adhesive as well as a filler, so it fills the gap, but it also sticks tenaciously to both the concrete and the bottom plate preventing any air from coming up in there. We did that before we put on the poly wall, Illuma flesh, and then we illumine over Neath that seam, so any water that gets back here runs and is able to drain away on the foundation thanks. So much for watching comment below with your favorite air-sealing tips and tricks subscribe if we've earned it go, follow us over at Instagram and we'll see you next time on the build show. So insulation works by keeping the air inside of it from being able to move back and forth, there's a really good insulator. So I don't know what the r-value of a foam cup is, but they just threw their. They just threw this McDonald's cup. Sorry chuckle Bell cup right in the wall and then thumbed over it. So I think it's got a pretty good insulation value.





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How To Attach Rigid Foam Insulation To Concrete







Spray foam insulation like this works very well in a variety of situations. This one happens to be a cathedral ceiling, so insulation is used to boost energy efficiency in the roof and in the walls, but there's something you have to understand and that's the difference between open cell and closed cell spray foam insulation and that's what this video sets Out to explain for you all spray foam can be roughly divided into two categories: there's the closed cell type, which is the most versatile and useful in cold climates, where heating is required, as opposed to open cell that I'll be discussing in a few minutes. Now, as the name suggests, closed cell is made of a whole bunch of closed cells and this matters because it affects how this particular kind of spray foam behaves in the real world. When it's applied thickly enough, it can act as its own vapor barrier and it's a very important and useful quality. The sides of the fact the closed cell foam delivers, on average a whopping r6 per inch and the fact that it can block air movement completely so drafts and air leakage of all kinds. The ability to block water vapor is a hidden and really useful feature. So imagine for a moment, you've got a wall structure. The top part of our cross section is closed-cell spray foam and the bottom section is more conventional fiber based insulation. This works really well, but it's it's kind of vulnerable in a way to let's say it's: minus 20 degrees Celsius on the outside of the wall and plus 20 degrees Celsius on the inside. This is a pretty typical wintertime situation and, let's imagine for a moment that there is no vapor barrier on the inside, as there normally is on a wall of this kind. If indoor air is allowed to pass into the wall because of the absence of the polyethylene vapor barrier, it's going to cool and eventually it's going to condense and drops of liquid water will appear within the wall. This, of course, is going to lead to mold and rot closed cell foam acts as its own vapor barrier, so moisture-laden air can't get in the wall and condense. Now, if polyethylene plastic is applied to the warm side of a fiber insulated wall, it solves this problem too, but it's not always possible to apply a vapor barrier like this accurately and completely closed cell foam also adds a remarkable amount of strength to a structure, because It'S so dense and it hears so well two framing structures. The other type of spray foam is called open cell precisely because the cells that make it up are more open, their number of advantages to open cell it's less expensive and it uses less resources. But there is a drawback, and this makes it less useful than a closed cell in cold and heating climates, although there certainly are uses for open cell as I'll explain specifically later. Imagine once again that we have spray foam insulation in a wall cavity except this time. It'S open cell. This type has a very powerful ability to block air movement so drafts and winds and things can't get through, but what it can't do, no matter how thickly it's applied is to prevent water vapor from entering the wall cavity. So once again, we've got the hazard of moisture entering a wall, cavity, cooling, condensing and promoting mold and rot unless something is done about it of course, and that something could be the application of a polyethylene vapor barrier on the inside. That particular combination works quite well. Even with extremes of warm and cold as you'd find during winter from an insulation point of view, open cell is significantly less effective per inch than closed cell it'll. Give you about our 3.5 for open compared with our six per for closed-cell, but on the plus side. Open-Cell is cheaper and it uses significantly fewer resources in its manufacturing, then closed cell. If you've spent much time researching the difference between open and closed cell insulation on the internet, you may have discovered something that I have and that's there's not a whole lot of recommended uses for open cell. So when exactly would you use this stuff? Well, one place is in a cooling climate, so a climate where you're gon na have to cool down the inside of your house much more often and much more intensely than heating it. So once again, let's start with a cross-section of some kind of a framing structure. This could be a roof or a wall or anything that separates indoor space from outdoor space. Now, let's put some open cell foam inside this structure and on the exterior of the structure, let's put on some sort of weatherproof covering it's going to shed water, but you can't really rely on it to prevent the movement of water vapor. So you've got the outdoor side of the structure and the indoor side and there's a temperature gradient between the two, but it's reversed compared with our previous example. Let'S say it's plus 35 C outside and the cooled air conditioned temperature inside is plus 20. So what do we have here? Well, if outdoor air is allowed to percolate through this wall, we're going to have the potential for some kind of condensation to occur? It'S not nearly the potential that would occur in a wintertime structure, but if there is any kind of condensation the beauty of the open cell is that it allows it to dry. It doesn't hold that moisture in and that's one of the reasons why you'd want to use something like this. A second instance when you might want to use open cell spray foam is in a vented attic situation, even in a heating climate. In fact, so imagine for a moment. You have a roof structure like you see here, and it's insulated with some open cell foam on the bottom of the Attic, so above the joists that would form the ceiling of the interior space. Now, as I said, this is open, celled foam, which means it can't stop the passage of water vapor, but it can dry and that's kind of one of its pluses in an application like this, there would be a vapor barrier of some kind on the warm side Of the insulation that would be required for this to work properly now in a heating climate, the indoor air would be warm and it would carry moisture to the extent that it could cause condensation unless it was deflected so to speak by the vapor barrier. So let's say it's raining and we have a roof leak and some moisture gets - and this is just one of many examples of how moisture can enter a building envelope. The beauty of open cell is that it can allow that moisture to escape. It can dry, it won't hold moisture in anywhere and that's really one of the main qualities for why you'd want to use it in a particular application. So, to recap, closed cell spray. Foam has specific qualities that make it work well in certain situations. It'S most often the foam of choice for cold climates, especially where that cold is extreme and the heating expectations are high. Second of all, it's strong and firm, so much so that it can actually increase the strength of a structure. Closed cell also does three things. Well. First, it blocks air movement exceptionally. Well, second, it blocks the passage of water vapor, that's the quality that separates it from open cell. As long as that closed cell is applied, three inches or thicker and, of course, closed-cell does deliver exceptional insulation properties as well about our six per inch open cell spray foam is most useful in warm climates where you have air conditioned spaces or anywhere, where you're not Going to have a condensation hazard, open cell costs less than closed cell, and it does two things particularly well. First of all, it blocks air movement and it delivers insulation. At a rate of about our three point, five per inch 





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How to Install Spray Foam Insulation DIY


Today i'm going to show you how to use a two-part spray foam insulation package. There'S a lot of different manufacturers of these packages, so just depend of what's available in your area, even though I'm going to show you how to use this particular one make sure you for sure read all the safety instructions and the user manual in whatever package you Get just to be sure that in case there's, any differences from manufacturer to manufacturer, so the one we have today is a what they call a two hundred kit. So what they're saying is that the yield on it will be about two hundred square feet worth of foam at one inch thick, so we're gonna be spraying close to two inches thick here, so we'll be hopefully getting around 100 square feet out of these two Cans at two inches thick, so once I opened up the box, some of the first things you find is you're gonna find the instruction manual as well as the you know: safety equipment, that's needed and all of the little tips and that sort of thing so Make sure you read that over well, most of these guys have 1-800 numbers and websites as well. So if you have other questions, you can get ahold of somebody to ask. You should find an assortment of some different spray Nozzles. 

These guys send two different types and they've sent about. I don't know four or five of each one. It looks like so this particular nozzle here is just for spraying. You know gaps and cracks sort of thing. It'S gon na send out a stream, so that would be that one here this one here is a fan tip. It'S got a bit of a v-notch cut in the end, so this one's gonna spray out about a I don't know it just depends on the kit you're using but probably eight-inch or so fan width of the pattern, which is good for filling wall. Cavities, like what we're gonna do here, so you'll have a bit of a selection of the tips in there. This kit comes with two two containers: two two steel cylinders. This particular one already has the hoses and the gun already hooked to it. That does have a bit of a carrying handle here as well. Some of the bigger kits they're gonna have tanks to teach in tanks, obviously because it's two components, but the tanks are much larger, so they come boxed separately just because they're too heavy to to carry is one unit. So in here, like I said this, one, the gun and the hoses are already attached to the tanks. Some of them you will, it will come with a wrench and you may have to attach your own hoses and gun a couple things to go over. I guess, since I've got the gun out putting on the tips, the gun has a bit of a safety trigger here this one. So the yellow button down here has to be compressed or pressed before you can actually squeeze the trigger. The tanks are still turned off by the way, so you don't want to turn them on until you're actually ready to spray. So this gun has a safety on it to attach a nozzle just get. It orientated wait right, there's, usually some marks in the end of the gun that correspond to the the way the nozzle looks and just push it in there on this one, this little lever here, you should just hear it click in like that and just look to Make sure that the little believer hook down on the lock knob on the top of the nozzle so putting the nozzle on just like that, taking it off squeeze this button, pull it off when you're spraying? If you stop, for more than about thirty seconds, you're, probably gon na find that you'll have to change your nozzle. So it's a good idea, get yourself all set up, get things out of the way, so that, once you start spraying, you can just kind of keep going with it and you aren't losing a bunch of time. Otherwise, you're gon na have to change your nozzles. What happens is the two components come in each come in their own hose and once they hit the nozzle there's a kind of a spiral II set up inside of the nozzle here that actually starts to mix the two homes, because until the two products mixed together, They don't actually have the chemical reaction which causes them to expand and cure. So if you stop for too long, it starts to set up in here and it clogs, and it's not gon na work properly. So that's why they send you multiple ones. So if you stop pop your tip off, put a new one on and away you go again, they also in this bag sent some petroleum jelly. So what they'd like you to do is smear some of the jelly right inside of the gun here and that just helps to allow your your tips not to seal up rate at the end of the gun. So you can just throw your tip way put anyone on and everything should be fine, so we've got the jelly optimally. Your tanks need to be around are usually about 24 degrees Celsius around so that'd be what I don't know about 79 78 degrees Fahrenheit to get the most yield out of them and to make everything work properly, so keep them somewhere stored. Warm you can spray on to a cooler surface, but you don't want something. That'S frosty and wet so like here where we're doing this in February and it's a below grade. So the wall is cool, but it's actually still about 2 degrees Celsius. So and there's no frost present, so that's your tanks once we're ready to go we're gon na open, both valves on the tanks completely you're gon na see the product start to come down the line once once. It fills up the lines. Oh before that, sorry, you should shake the tanks really well. I think it's usually around 3040 seconds. You need to agitate the tanks that will just get things mixed together, open your valves, let it bleed into the lines. Do your petroleum jelly, get your tip, ready and and then you're pretty much close to being ready to spray, and obviously, before that, put on all your your protective equipment protective equipment? These guys recommend, if you don't have real good ventilation, that you should be wearing a respirator similar to this and it's fitted with cartridges that are for organic vapor as well as particle filtration, so they're kind of a two-part cannister one. Does the organic part of the chemicals and the other just does the any solids that might be in the air? So so it's important to have that if you don't have the proper ventilation, we did a did. A video with us with a similar product there a while ago, and we had a lot of people freaking out because we weren't wearing a mask. We did talk in the video, how we had lots of ventilation and everything, but we still had people kind of freaking out, so we've actually gon na redo this video today and we don't have the ventilation here quite as good. We just were able to open a couple windows, so we're gon na use the mask for sure also some rubber gloves to protect your hands. You already see that I have the the painters suit on or the bodysuit on, to protect my clothing, I'm wearing a hat I'll, have safety glasses on. So it's just to protect yourself from any spray back that you might get. It doesn't happen very often, but you never know you could get some bounce back onto you so and it doesn't come off that easily. You definitely don't want it in your eyes or your mouth or anything like that. So so that's for the protective part. I think I've I've shaken the tanks, pretty good, we'll give him another little shake shake before we go just before. I actually use a nozzle and once I've got the tanks open, I'm gon na shoot the gun into a garbage can or a box or in our case, we're gon na use. A garbage can just to make sure I'm getting two fairly even streams coming out. Then I'll get my tip on and and start spraying, so when you're spraying it's much like kind of in a way like spraying paint. If you've ever had to do that, we're gon na come up to the wall. We want to be about six or eight inches away from the wall and we're just gon na. You know, regulate our speed by hand to put on the amount that we want to see get on now. Remember it's going to expand some, so you don't want to fill the cavity rate up right away or once it expands you're just gon na be having to cut it all off, because it's it's sticking out too much. You know. So it's simply squeeze the trigger regulate. Your speed let go of the trigger squeeze and come down again. Okay, so you just keep doing that. We'Re gon na do these some of these spaces here in preparation. What we've done any electrical boxes, you'll want to tape them up or seal them up, because once the foam gets in and around them, it'll actually expand into the the open holes and cavities of the box and actually end up inside. So you want to prevent that. So we've just wrapped this one in some plastic, the wiring is fine to be embedded in the spray foam that isn't a problem. We'Ve just basically brushed the wall off, made sure it wasn't covered in any cobwebs and dust and that if the wall is damp or frosty or anything you you want to make sure you warm it up and dry it off before you spray this on that won't Bond to the concrete as well, you will get some probably overspray onto some of your framing materials here. We'Ve just got two by twos, but that will clean off with a scraper fairly easily once it secured anything. That'S around the area that you don't want to get foam on, just Paulie it up or tape it off or whatever. Just to be sure you aren't getting some overspray on anything that you didn't want to cover so we're gon na spray. Some rate on this concrete wall, I'm gon na, go up and do a couple cavities in that wood wall too. It'S really just the same thing, but I just thought: I'd show it since we can. I think that's pretty much covering everything that I'd talked about again. Remember just keep your foam canisters at a good temperature. These ones actually have a little temperature gauge on them. So that's kind of handy to know where you're at but just keep them inside, so they're they're warmed up and good to go. You don't want to directly. You know blast a furnace on them or wrap them in electrical heat blanket or something like that, not nothing that extreme, but just make sure they're warmed up well, okay, so I'm going to put on my protective equipment. You may not be able to hear me as well with the mask on so that's why I was trying to cover everything here well before I get all suited up, but I may may do bit of talking with the mask on, but it may not be that Clear so so I'm just going to break away here for a minute, get my personal, personal, protective equipment on and then we'll come back and show you how to spray [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ] [, Music, ] [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], Applause, ], Applause, ], Applause, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], okay, so we've let things sit here for a little bit and let the fumes get out. So we can take the mask off and finish up. You can see it's expanded out nicely, it's nice and firm. If you get a wrong mixture, sometimes you'll get a clogged line or something. So if you get too much of one of the chemicals - and I can't remember - which way it is you'll actually get soft mushy foam and if it goes, the other way where the other chemical is is too much. The foam is really brittle in and it almost just doesn't stand up. If you touch it, it actually crumbles away right away where this is well. This is good. This is nice and firm. That'S exactly what we want so now. The next step that we're kind of at and some actually something I didn't mention - was in most areas. If you spray up the two inches, you more than likely will not have to put the poly vapor barrier on the inside, so just check with your local codes. On that, the one thing to consider when doing that, and you notice that I put on two to three different coats like passes, so that those first couple get a chance to actually cure before you cover them up and form that skin over it, which gives you That that airlock or that air stoppage, because what's gon na happen now you can see where some of this foam has expanded past the actual framing. So I'm gon na go back. You know and trim it back flush. So now, if I did had done that all in one pass now that I cut that that probably compromises the vapor barrier, qualities of it where because I've got those couple passes in behind that, I'm not going to be cutting into. In my opinion, that's still pretty good, so in this case we're we're actually only in most in a lot of this we're a little less than an inch and a quarter or inch and a half thick. So we'll we're gon na need and from my area, we're gon na need another vapor barrier anyways, but something to consider so, if you're free, if you're spraying into a 2x4 wall where you've got the the ability to spray at two or two and a half inches Thick go ahead and do it check with your local Building Authority because you may not have to put a vapor barrier over after okay, let's move on so we've got it all sprayed. You can see I'm just taking a utility knife and just shaving this down flush with the studs and just clean it all up peel it off. So you just go around, do all that, because otherwise, if it's sticking out and you go to drywall over top of that, it's it's gon na give you some issues with pop screws and that sort of thing. Okay, so just keep going around another thing you can use is the old handy red bar scrape things down, get right, underneath it scrape it off like that once the foam is, is its secured point. This is not hazardous anymore. You can throw this right in the garbage, don't eat it, throw it in the garbage, but you don't you don't need the mask. I don't really even need the gloves on anymore, but just go around. Get things cleaned up so that it's all good for when you want to put the finishing touches over top of it? What else did I forget anything? I think that I think that should cover it so now you've seen how to do it. This may not be the most economical way if you're gon na do a whole basement. These kits aren't aren't real cheap. It might be cheaper to actually have a pearl come in and give you a price to do the whole thing. If you're in a remote area, though this might be the only option you have, if you're gon na do a you know a couple rooms or a little bit of space, then also again, it might might still be very economical to do it like this. This stuff works really good for joist ends as well so, and we do have a video on that. So if you want to check that out so yeah, I think that's all. I can tell you so that again, I'm Shannon from house improvements and if you want to go to our website, you can check out the forum. Ask any questions you might have about this on there and I'll get get a reply off to you as soon as I can, and also you can check out our YouTube channel and see all the other videos we have thanks for coming and watching. 

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